Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)

Doctor of Business Administration (DBA)

The Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) program is designed for experienced professionals who are seeking to gain a deeper understanding of the principles that govern global business.

The program emphasizes advanced decision-making and leadership skills, as well as in-depth knowledge of theory and applied research. Doctoral students have the opportunity to explore the challenges facing business today, including corporate social responsibility, globalization, and managing change.

In keeping with our commitment to working adult professionals, we have one of the few doctoral programs in Southern California that allows students to complete their studies in a synchronous hybrid or online format.

Mission Statement

The mission of the Doctor of Business Administration program is to present advanced business concepts to graduate students through the exploration and discovery of new knowledge. The program creates meaningful learning experiences that develop practitioner-based scholars who from a leadership perspective can apply creative and innovative concepts pragmatically to complex and diverse business problems. It promotes leaders contributing to the field of business using sustainable practices in an ethical and professional manner.

DBA Program Description

The Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) is designed for candidates who, having already completed a Masters program, are looking to further develop their practical and theoretical knowledge of the principles that govern global business. Our DBA program emphasizes advanced decision-making and leadership skills as well as in-depth knowledge of theory and applied research.

Students have the opportunity to explore challenges facing business today, including corporate social responsibility, globalization, and managing change. In keeping with our commitment to working adult professionals, we have one of the few doctoral programs in Southern California that allows students to complete their doctoral studies in a hybrid or online format.

The performance outcomes which are required for the completion of the program include class participation, response to discussion questions, writing research papers, group assignments, case study analyses, quizzes, Comprehensive Learning Assessments, and a Doctoral Dissertation.

DBA Program Learning Outcomes

DBA Program Learning Outcomes

Westcliff University produces capable and knowledgeable students who manifest an understanding of work and careers and an ability to adapt quickly to the expectations of employers and the work environment.

The Doctor of Business Administration learning outcomes prepare students to:

1
Develop effective presentation of business analyses, research, and recommendations through written forms of communication with specificity and appropriate to the intended audience
2
Develop effective presentation of business analyses, research, and recommendations through oral communication of conventions and forms with specificity and appropriate to the intended audience
3
Critique how a broader understanding of cultural differences results in personal competencies that positively impact business strategies
4
Formulate how transformational leadership can improve the implementation of business objectives no matter the location of the business
5
Evaluate how the relationship between vision and tactics can result in meaningful and successful strategies in a complex business environment
6
Judge and measure how the internal and external criteria for an organization may be used to maximize both efficiency and effectiveness of a business operation
7
Justify the ethical choices related to societal issues, so as to optimize organization effectiveness in a global setting
8
Evaluate the essence of business knowledge in existing literature to produce new, meaningful ideas that have practical applications
9
Integrate the innovative principles in business operations that contribute to the advancement of business management and leadership
10
Create strategic opportunities by providing innovative solutions to complex business problems using quantitative reasoning and methodologies that contribute to organizational sustainability

More Course Information

  • DBA Core Course Requirements

    1st Year = 19.5 credits

    BUS 700 Leadership and Creative Solutions Implementation (3 credit hours)

    BUS 705 Management, Strategy, Planning and Implementation (3 credit hours)

    BUS 710 Financial Risk in Business (3 credit hours)

    BUS 720 Marketing Strategy & Consumer Behavior (3 credit hours)

    RES 711 Business Research Methods I (4.5 credit hours)

    RES 721 Doctoral Prospectus (3 credit hours)

    2nd Year = 19.5 credits

    1st Concentration Course - choose from the following: Business Intelligence & Data Analytics (BIDA), Strategic Leadership for the 21st Century, Applied Computer Science (ACS) or Information Technology Management (ITM) (3 credit hours)

    BUS 731 Global Economics & Business Initiatives (3 credit hours)

    BUS 732 Corporate Social Responsibility in Organizational Development (3 credit hours)

    2nd Concentration Course - choose from the following: Business Intelligence & Data Analytics (BIDA), Strategic Leadership for the 21st Century, Applied Computer Science (ACS) or Information Technology Management (ITM) (3 credit hours)

    RES 741 Business Research Methods II (4.5 credit hours)

    RES 751 Doctoral Literature Review/Candidacy Review (3 credit hours)

    3rd Year = 21 credits

    3rd Concentration Course - choose from the following: Business Intelligence & Data Analytics (BIDA), Strategic Leadership for the 21st Century, Applied Computer Science (ACS) or Information Technology Management (ITM) (3 credit hours)

    4th Concentration Course - choose from the following: Business Intelligence & Data Analytics (BIDA), Strategic Leadership for the 21st Century, Applied Computer Science (ACS) or Information Technology Management (ITM) (3 credit hours)

    BUS 900 Dissertation Final Project Block 1 (3 credit hours)

    BUS 901 Dissertation Final Project Block 2/Preliminary Defense (4.5 credit hours)

    BUS 902 Dissertation Final Project Block 3 (3 credit hours)

    BUS 903 Dissertation Final Project Block 4/Final Defense (4.5 credit hours)

  • DBA Areas of Concentration

    In order to graduate with a concentration, students must take four (4) courses as indicated below under each concentration.

    Business Intelligence and Data Analytics
    Strategic Leadership in the 21st Century
    Information Technology Management
    Applied Computer Science

    Concentration in Business Intelligence and Data Analytics (STEM)

    The DBA Concentration in Business Intelligence & Data Analytics (BIDA) prepares business executives with the knowledge and acumen to solve complex business problems, enabling organizations to remain competitive in the 21st-century globalized economy. Through the use of data analytics and Business Intelligence (BI) tools, doctoral students will gain valuable insights about customers, competitors, internal operations, and external variables that influence organizational strategy, and will enhance their ability to make better strategic decisions. Doctoral students will analyze business data and be able to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of business operations and also become fastidious about future predictions and strategic implementation. The curriculum is purposeful in integrating BI & DA concepts, theories, and practices that are in alignment with industry-recognized professional certifications in BI & DA from Microsoft, tdwi, Google, and Qlik. This concentration builds a strong foundation in executive analytics that will enable doctoral students to utilize business intelligence tools such as artificial intelligence (AI), predictive and prescriptive analytics, and decision support systems.

    BUS 800 Foundations in Analytics for Executives - 3 credit hours
    BUS 801 BI, Analytics, & Decision Support - 3 credit hours
    BUS 802 Time Series & Predictive Analysis for Business - 3 credit hours
    BUS 803 Artificial Intelligence & Prescriptive Analytics* - 3 credit hours

    Concentration in Strategic Leadership in the 21st Century

    Expectations are high for the changes this decade is likely to bring to the workplace. Leadership influencers are forecasting challenges that leaders will face as a new level of workplace transformation continues to be shaped by accelerating technology changes, increasing consumer expectations, and hyper-connectivity. The goal of this concentration is to prepare students to meet these challenges by introducing the concepts of Artificial Intelligence (AI), Work Culture, Employee Experience, Data, Change, Analytics, Diversity, Productivity, Automation, and Well-Being.

    BUS 810 Building Positive Relationships in a Multigenerational Workforce - 3 credit hours
    BUS 811 Emotional Intelligence in Transformational Leadership - 3 credit hours
    BUS 812 Emerging Technology for Effective Leadership - 3 credit hours
    BUS 814 Global Leadership - 3 credit hours

    Concentration in Information Technology Management (STEM)

    The DBA Concentration in Information Technology (ITM) prepares doctoral students with the knowledge and acumen required to attain roles as senior directors and executives, leading functional information technology systems and business-related technology divisions and/or units. The ITM concentration curriculum is designed to enable business and technology administrators to lead and manage enterprise-wide IT projects and to solve complex business and IT problems. Emphasis is placed on projects that ensure digital assets security as well as on developing the expertise to implement a governance and management enterprise IT infrastructure. Modern and advanced topics in ITM such as data analytics in project management or investigated. Doctoral students will gain valuable insights into the strategic frameworks needed to sustain competitive advantage through the use of IT and other emerging technologies. This concentration has its design roots in the Project Management Institute (PMI) Guide to the Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), so qualified candidates can be prepared to sit for industry-recognized certification(s) (CIO Magazine ranked the PMP as the top PM certification worldwide) such as the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM), Project Management Professional (PMP), and/or the Portfolio Management Professional (PfMP). In addition, qualified candidates can be prepared to sit for the industry-recognized certification for the Certified Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT) credential and/or the Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) credential. At the enterprise-level, organizations must rely on senior directors and executives to ensure that industry standards regarding the compliance and governance of IT infrastructure are in place and adhered to. Thus, a purposeful effort to align part of the curriculum with the Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA), an accepted Information Systems Knowledge and Practice platform, has been made to ensure graduates have the essential knowledge needed to administer enterprise IT governance. Finally, the ITM concentration delves into advanced IT topics such as Business Intelligence (BI) and the enterprise-level management of information systems (MIS) to ensure that graduates have a meaningful, substantial, and momentous impact on the organization through a holistic technology leadership approach.

    BUS 820 Business Intelligence & Information Systems - 3 credit hours
    BUS 821 Management Information Systems & Advanced IT - 3 credit hours
    BUS 822 Information Technology Project & Portfolio Management - 3 credit hours
    BUS 823 Governance of Enterprise IT Initiatives - 3 credit hours

    Concentration in Applied Computer Science (STEM)

    The DBA Concentration in Applied Computer Science (ACS) prepares doctoral students with the knowledge and acumen required to attain roles as senior directors and executives, leading functional computer science, software, information systems, and technology business-related divisions and/or units. The ACS concentration curriculum is designed to enable technology administrators to lead enterprise-wide initiatives in software engineering and computer science that incorporate relevant, current, and emerging technologies for the purpose of sustaining competitive advantage, while expanding and adapting new computer science and industry standards, frameworks, and best practices. Part of the ACS curriculum is aligned with the International Information System Security Certification Consortium’s (ISC)2 Certified Secure Software Lifecycle Professional (CSSLP) certification, and CompTIA’s Advanced Security Practitioner (CASP+) certification, so qualified candidates can be prepared to sit for these industry-recognized certifications. Graduates will be prepared to establish and direct long-term strategic goals, policies, and related procedures for the organization’s technology and software development programs. This exciting concentration delves into software engineering concepts, Business Intelligence (BI), analytical tools to support organizational decisions, software security design principles, and examines the virtual and augmented world of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and various Intelligent User Interfaces (IUI) in preparation for the next wave of a more dynamic interconnect between humans and machines.

    BUS 801 BI, Analytics, & Decision Support - 3 credit hours
    BUS 830 Software Engineering Concepts - 3 credit hours
    BUS 831 Security in Software Design & Development - 3 credit hours
    BUS 832 Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) Design - 3 credit hours

Course Descriptions

  • DBA Course Descriptions

    BUS 505 Managerial Economics (3 credit hours) DBA Prerequisite Course This course applies economic principles and methodologies to business decision problems relating to costs, prices, revenues, profits, and competitive strategies and provides an analytical base for the study of the corporate strategy process. Basic economic theory and application of analysis to management decision-making are covered. The general model used for organizational architecture consists of three aspects of corporate organization. The theory is also applied to topics such as performance evaluation, leadership, understanding the business environment, and ethics.

    BUS 535 Managerial Accounting (3 credit hours) DBA Prerequisite Course This course provides students with accounting and analytical skills useful for managerial decision-making. Topics covered include performance evaluation, pricing and operational decisions, strategy, cost allocation, variance analysis, inventory, and capital budgeting, among others.

    BUS 550 Financial Management (3 credit hours) DBA Prerequisite Course 

    This course is an applied financial and managerial accounting course. The course focuses on the principles of financial and managerial accounting used to resolve difficult strategic and operational decisions. The objective of this course is to provide the decision-makers with financial and managerial accounting theory, concepts, and tools necessary to make better financial management decisions as well as enable the student to make sound judgments regarding financial analyses performed by others. 

    BUS 700 Leadership and Creative Solutions Implementation (3 credit hours) Leaders and organizations in the new globalized and techno-savvy economy must be agile, continuously responding to external variables and thus changing to meet the needs of this new environment. The management of change within an organization is essential and ensures that people within the organization embrace change and view it as a success factor. This course emphasizes how leaders and managers can utilize creative problem-solving techniques to overcome the barriers to problem resolution. Throughout the course, a systematic and algorithmic methodology for creativity is studied and problem-solving techniques are discussed to show how leaders can better forecast business challenges before they become problematic.

    BUS 705 Management Strategy, Planning, and Implementation (3 credit hours) This course explores the strategic application of key activities indigenous to the mission and value that leads directly to the attainment of organizational goals. People are the most important and valuable resource within an organization, and as such must be incorporated in any functional business strategy. Strategic principles related to achieving the maximum performance from managing people are explored. Planning for performance, identifying opportunities, strengths, weaknesses, and threats are examined in great detail to obtain a strategy for a sustainable competitive advantage.

    BUS 710 Finance for Managers/Financial Decision Making & Risk Management (3 credit hours) This course covers significant aspects of finance for managers as it relates to financial resources through capital attainment, asset allocation, and budgeting. The information is presented in the framework of making intelligent financial decisions for the organization that is in line with organizational goals and by utilizing financial statement analysis.

    BUS 720 Marketing Strategy & Consumer Behavior (3 credit hours) This course takes an in-depth approach to consumer behavior as it relates directly to forecasting and marketing strategy. The course also employs theories from disciplines, including sociology, psychology, and economics to the activities that affect consumer behavior in decision making when purchasing goods and services. Marketing strategies are developed throughout the course to verify if marketing models influence consumer behavior.

    BUS 725 Business Intelligence & Information Systems (3 credit hours) This course examines Business Intelligence tools used in establishing a sustainable competitive advantage for business. Tools such as Data-Mining, Data-Warehousing, AI, and are researched and applied to obtain information about customer-base, competition, internal operations, and external business environment all in an effort to make better strategic business decisions. While Information Technology is examined; its application towards business management and organizational goals is predominant.

    BUS 731 Global Economics & Business Initiatives (3 credit hours) This course provides an in-depth analysis and understanding of the globalized economy and global business initiatives with a special focus on Multi-National Corporations (MNCs). It encompasses the theoretical analysis of free trade and protectionism, the important issues of terms of trade, offer curve, forward and spot exchange rate markets, purchasing power parity, and interest rate parity. It analyzes global business issues of foreign direct investments, supply chain management, outsourcing, currency risk, and political risk in different political and economic environments, developed, emerging, and developing economies. It also entails global business initiatives such as global business mergers and acquisitions, global cultural and ethical diversity, sustainable business growth, building business global branding, and multicultural negotiations for MNCs. This course looks at the specific international business relationships of China, Southeast Asia, and India. 

    BUS 732 Corporate Social Responsibility in Organizational Development (3 credit hours) This course looks at how organizations must change and adapt in an effort to make or offer a better good or service within the context of ethics, social responsibility, and decision making. Corporate ethical dilemmas are presented and decisions are linked to consequences that affect the organization and society at large. Analysis of organizational strategy is studied to understand how to move forward and develop an organization that is adaptable to change.

    BUS 750 Statistics for Business (3 credit hours) This course examines how the collection, description, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of data can lead to insight on competitive advantage. The statistics are presented in a business context and address business-related issues and challenges. Focus on the application of some statistical methods in business contexts that will be studied, along with the interpretation of statistics to business problems.

    BUS 765 Management for Technological Innovation (3 credit hours) This course examines the managerial aspects of technological innovation in the business arena as a source of competitive advantage. Concepts such as flexible manufacturing, modular components modeling, and strategic management of innovation are presented. Developed concepts such as foundations of technological innovation, best practices, and team composition are analyzed.

    BUS 800 Foundations in Analytics for Executives (3 credit hours) This course offers real-world guidance for organizations looking to leverage their data into a competitive advantage. Students will learn how Hadoop can upgrade data processing and storage, discover the many uses for social media data in analysis and communication, and get you up to speed on the latest in cloud technologies, and data security to better prepare you for emerging technologies and the future of business analytics. The course will also provide an integrated and strategic approach to higher-value analytics for leaders and innovators by transforming actionable data into strategic insights for profitability and growth. The course investigates and relates case studies and examples that illustrate real-world scenarios in which an optimized analytics system can revolutionize an organization's business methodology for competing in the globalized economy.

    BUS 801 BI, Analytics, & Decision Support (3 credit hours) Prerequisite: BUS 800 This course offers business professionals, managers, and students a way to learn the basics of computerized decision support including analytics, decision support system, big data, and business intelligence along with the business use cases. This course examines the Internet of Things (IoT) and data analytics from a technical, application, and business perspective needed to build the essential technical knowledge, processes, design principles, implementation, and marketing for IoT projects. The course provides an overview and anatomy of IoT, the ecosystem of IoT, communication protocols, networking, and available hardware, both present, and future applications and transformations, and business models. The course also addresses big data analytics, machine learning, cloud computing, and consideration of sustainability that are essential to be both socially responsible and successful in multiple disciplines including consumer, government, and enterprise applications. 

    BUS 802 Time Series & Predictive Analysis for Business (3 credit hours) This course provides an introduction to time series analysis and forecasting for students with little background in mathematics and statistics. The course presents the theories of time series analysis that are needed to analyze time-oriented data and construct real-world-short- to medium-term statistical forecasts. The course offers exercises from diverse disciplines including health care, environmental studies, engineering, and finance in more than 50 programming algorithms using JMP®, SAS®, and R that illustrate the theory and practicality of forecasting techniques in the context of time-oriented data. The course teaches methods of data analysis and their application to real-world data sets and also serves as an introduction to data mining methods and models, including association rules, clustering, neural networks, logistic regression, and multivariate analysis. This course appeals to computer science and statistic students, as well as students in MBA programs, and chief executives.

    BUS 803 Artificial Intelligence and Prescriptive Analytics (3 credit hours) This course helps students understand how to turn unstructured data from emails, chats, social media, audio, and video into valuable business insight. The course includes examples from several industry leaders and organizations such as Google, Amazon, Spotify, LinkedIn, Pfizer Manulife, AXA, Monster Worldwide, Under Armour, the Houston Rockets, DELL, IBM, and SAS Institute. The course will then help the students understand the full extent of technology's impact and how soon the future will arrive, how to leverage the new emerging paradigm into a sustainable business advantage and adopt a strategic model for winning in the new economy. The course will then help the students learn how to maximize profit and optimize decisions with advanced business analytics that add value and drive better business using big data analytics.

    BUS 804 Operations & Supply Chain Management Analytics (3 credit hours) This course creates a managerial compass for entering into the LIVING (Live, Intelligent, Velocity, Interactive, Networked, and Good) era of supply chain management and defines the imperative for creating Velocity and Visibility as the focal point for exploiting new digital, mobile, and cloud-based technologies. The course is a comprehensive introductory guide to quantitative techniques, with practical Excel-based solutions for strategic health care management and covers areas such as predictive analytics, geographical information systems, flow process improvement, lean management, six sigma, health provider productivity and benchmarking, project management, simulation, and much more. The course addresses major management opportunities, focuses on implementation, provides action-oriented treatment of sustainability. The course introduces the students, managers, or experienced sustainability advocates, to the various tools, frameworks, and approaches that really work.

    BUS 810 Building Positive Relationships in a Multigenerational Workforce (3 credit hours) People are the focus of a leader’s efforts. Understanding the people they lead is critical to a leader’s success. A key function of leadership is to recognize the values of the people in order to provide leadership with which they can identify. An effective leader then must build relationships with the people and create a community. Mastering strategies for motivating a multigenerational workforce enables leaders to capitalize on the unique strengths that each employee brings. This course explores the qualities a leader must possess including developing a vision, setting goals, managing change, assuming responsibility, and providing opportunities for engagement for all team members. The value of commitment and providing meaning for employees is considered.

    BUS 811 Emotional Intelligence in Transformational Leadership (3 credit hours) Often when hiring for leadership roles, organizations seek professionals with experience and well-tested skills. Leadership strengths related to emotional intelligence play a significant role. Leaders who possess a high level of emotional intelligence are connected to their own emotions and have the ability to recognize, relate to, and influence the emotions of those with whom they interact. They create more connected and motivated teams, inspire others, have personal integrity that they role model to others, possess well-honed communication skills, and are comfortable with building relationships with a wide variety of people. This course explores students’ emotional intelligence, how emotional intelligence is linked to the key tenets of transformational leadership, and students’ understanding of their conscious approach to leadership.

    BUS 812 Emerging Technology for Effective Leadership (3 semester credit hours) Technology continues to exact significant changes in the workforce from automation to the enhancement of the customer experience. It can provide leaders with useful strategic decision-making tools to support the achievement of organizational goals. The challenge that 21st-century leaders face is how to utilize new technologies in ways that not only create efficiencies but also to support and encourage human creativity, ingenuity, and judgment. Augmenting leadership with technology will greatly increase leaders’ abilities to meet these challenges, and help their organizations flourish. This course looks at data mining, predictive analytics, and machine learning to create value; increase job satisfaction and productivity, automate the management function and operations, augment innovation, and improve processes.

    BUS 813 Boundary Spanning Leadership (3 credit hours) A key skill for leaders is their ability to collaborate, bridge divides, and transform the talents and knowledge of their teams to deliver value to their organizations. This course aims to define the notion of boundary spanning leadership and provide a platform for students to put it into practice. Areas of focus include: buffering to create a place of safety, reflection on boundaries to nurture respect, creating connections to build trust, recreating boundaries to develop community, advancing interdependence and transforming boundaries to support innovation.

    BUS 814 Global Leadership (3 credit hours) The qualities required by those leaders who provide support on a global level are not often recognized as distinct to those needed by any leaders. The assumption that domestic skills can readily be exported to a world stage is flawed. The focus of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to practice the ability to shift strategies, business processes, and personal leadership styles to fit a broader range of employee demographics and be mindful of their differing motivations. Areas of cultural self-awareness, achieving results through relationships, frame-shifting, adapting, and adding value are explored.

    BUS 820 Business Intelligence & Information Systems (3 credit hours) This course examines Business Intelligence tools used in establishing a sustainable competitive advantage for business by transforming data into actionable insights. Tools such as Data Mining, Data-Warehousing, Knowledge Management (KM), Data Visualization, Dashboards, and Collaboration Platforms, and AI are researched and applied to obtain information about customer-base, competition, internal operations, and external business environment—all in an effort to make better strategic business decisions. The course is presented in the framework of, 1. Identify a clear business problem/challenge, 2. Identify what data/metrics (and where the data resides in the Information System) needs to be analyzed to provide insight on potential solutions, 3. Understand the type of data analysis to be performed, and 4. Determine what and how IT resources are to be deployed to implement the solution.

    BUS 821 Management Information Systems & Advance IT (3 credit hours) This advanced course takes a holistic perspective of managing Information Systems and the advancement of IT. The course explores the various perspectives and intersections of technology, people, and business initiatives. Topics include the efficacy of database systems, business informatics, information security, IT project management, computer science integration, digitization, and enterprise technology solutions for complex business challenges. Students will have a solid foundation for managing advanced IT initiatives and developing strategic plans that foster a proactive approach to the incorporation of IT for the future.

    BUS 822 Information Technology Project & Portfolio Management (3 credit hours) This course is a perfect amalgam of IT Project and Portfolio Management that provides students with advanced competencies, tools, and techniques for managing and coordinating projects and portfolios in the IT-sphere. IT Project Management (PM) is partially based on the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), and Portfolio Management is introduced and examined as a methodology to close the gap between strategic initiatives and implementation. Students will be prepared to apply appropriate theories, principles and practices, skills, and techniques to facilitate the planning, organization, management, and control of IT projects and portfolios.

    BUS 823 Governance of Enterprise IT Initiatives (3 credit hours) This course is constructed and designed to meet the needs of the executive, future, and current C-suite managers of Information Technology (IT). In mid-to-large enterprises or organizations, it is essential to have an effective IT management and governance framework that provides a strong infrastructure to properly house and administer underlying core processes. Concepts covered in-depth are best practices for core IT processes, improvement, and ownership. Topics include strategic management, IT frameworks for governance, IT systems benefits realization, as well as risk and resource optimization. The goal of this course is to ensure that Enterprise IT is in alignment with the mission, vision, and strategic objectives of the organization.

    BUS 830 Software Engineering Concepts (3 credit hours) This course is designed to demonstrate the engineering approach to the development of large, high-quality software projects. Topics include software life cycle, development process, requirement specifications, design and testing techniques, verification and validation, and software management. Students learn to use project management tools, principles, and environments to facilitate the development of software programs and systems.

    BUS 831 Security in Software Design & Development (3 credit hours) This course has a focus on the secure software design and development processes that can reduce the number and severity of vulnerabilities, thus mitigating the effects of computer security breaches, and consequently enhancing the dimensions of software quality. Paramount to organizational data and system security is a solid and sophisticated approach to the creation and management of necessary processes and protocols needed to construct a Secure Development Lifecycle (SDLC). This course prepares doctoral students to develop executive-level skills that improve the overall enterprise security posture by incorporating effective software testing and implementing proactive software security measures. Topics covered include secure software and design concepts, SDLC, software implementation and deployment, operations, and software maintenance.

    BUS 832 Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) Design (3 credit hours) This course focuses on interactions between humans and machines (computer-based) in the context of interaction design. An investigation in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) forms the basis of research in this course. Topics covered include different types of interfaces and applications, design approaches, as well as cognitive and social issues as they apply to interaction design. The evaluation of a wide range of new applications and devices are performed, and the course includes hands-on activities that can form the basis of student projects in HCI. Students conduct research on how technology and HCI is transforming the way society as a whole communicates, including consequent ethical considerations.

    BUS 900 Dissertation Final Project Block I (3 credit hours) This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed to guide students in the preparation of completing an original project/dissertation. Students must develop, write, and submit the methodology (Chapter 3). If Dissertation Committee members do not approve Chapter 3, it will be sent back to doctoral candidates with recommendations and required edits. Subsequently, the doctoral candidates must implement recommendations and edits and resubmit for final approval. The student must submit a research application to the Dissertation Committee for approval. If the Dissertation Committee does not approve the research application the student must implement recommendations and edits and resubmit for final approval.

    BUS 900e Dissertation Final Project Block I Extension (3 credit hours) This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed for doctoral candidates who receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) during their initial attempt at completing BUS 900 Dissertation Final Project Block I by the end of 8 weeks. This course may only be taken one (1) time.

    BUS 901 Dissertation Final Project Block II/Preliminary Defense (4.5 credit hours)

    This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed to guide students in successfully applying for and gaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval of their study, and preparing them for a preliminary oral defense of their Proposal. Students may not begin collecting data in any way without first acquiring IRB approval.

    The preliminary oral defense consists of a complete PowerPoint presentation that depicts the doctoral candidate’s proposed dissertation. In conjunction with the Dissertation Chair and Dissertation Committee members, the University will plan for the preliminary defense. The student will present the final defense before the aforementioned staff members for approval. If Committee members do not approve the dissertation PowerPoint presentation and/or paper, they will be sent back to the doctoral candidate with recommendations and required edits. Subsequently, the doctoral candidate must implement recommendations and edits and resubmit for final approval.

    BUS 901e Dissertation Final Project Block II Extension (4.5 credit hours) This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed for doctoral candidates who receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) during their initial attempt at completing BUS 901 Dissertation Final Project Block II by the end of 8 weeks. This course may only be taken one (1) time.

    BUS 902 Dissertation Final Project Block III (3 credit hours)

    This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed to guide students in collecting and analyzing data, and the preparation of completing Chapter 4 of their dissertation.

    Students will complete data collection, analysis, and interpretation of the results, and then draw conclusions based on the combined results and literature review. Students write and submit the results of Chapter 4. If Dissertation Committee members do not approve Chapter 4, it will be sent back to the doctoral candidate with recommendations and required edits. Subsequently, the doctoral candidate must implement recommendations and edits and resubmit for final approval.

    BUS 902e Dissertation Final Block III Extension (3 credit hours) This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed for doctoral candidates who receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) during their initial attempt at completing BUS 902 Dissertation Final Project Block III by the end of 8 weeks. This course may only be taken one (1) time.

    BUS 903 Dissertation Final Project Block IV/Final Defense (4.5 credit hours)

    This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed to guide students in the preparation of completing Chapter 5 of their dissertation and preparing them to successfully pass the final oral defense. 

    The student will draw conclusions based on the results of their study and literature review for Chapter 5, as well as provide recommendations for further research, and submit for final approval. If Dissertation Committee members do not approve Chapter 5, it will be sent back to the doctoral candidate with recommendations and required edits. Subsequently, the doctoral candidate must implement recommendations and edits, and resubmit for final approval. A final document consisting of all five (5) chapters will be submitted (in APA, 7th edition format). Finally, students will prepare and deliver an oral defense of the dissertation to the Dissertation Chair, Committee members, and the University for approval.

    The final oral defense consists of a complete PowerPoint presentation that depicts the doctoral candidate’s dissertation in its entirety. In conjunction with the Dissertation Chair and Committee members, the University will plan for the final defense. If Committee members do not approve the dissertation PowerPoint presentation and/or paper, they will be sent back to the doctoral candidate with recommendations and required edits. Subsequently, the doctoral candidate must implement recommendations and edits and resubmit for final approval.

    BUS 903e Dissertation Final Project Block IV Extension (4.5 credit hours) This course is 8 weeks in length and is designed for doctoral candidates who receive a grade of Limited Progress (LP) during their initial attempt at completing BUS 903 Dissertation Final Project Block IV by the end of 8 weeks. This course may only be taken one (1) time.

    RES 711 Research Methods I (4.5 credit hours)

    This course investigates methods of quantitative and qualitative research, including data collection and analysis, and provides a framework based on which researchers can design their research methodology.

    In qualitative research, different orientations including, phenomenological, ethnographic, grounded theory, and case study are covered. Data collection methods including interviews, focus groups, participant observation, historical research, survey interviews, and instruments are also discussed. In addition, the course covers qualitative data coding and analysis.      

    In quantitative methods, topics include fundamentals of statistical research as they relate to developing doctoral dissertations, including concepts of probability, probability distributions, evaluative statistical research on a population, and comparative research incorporating two populations. Additional topics include creating surveys and evaluating validity and reliability. A section on nonparametric statistics is also included in this course.

    RES 721 Doctoral Prospectus (3 credit hours) This course is a culmination of the research curricula leading students through the pre-dissertation preparation processes. The pre-dissertation process consists of; writing the prospectus and forming the dissertation committee. The final assignment is a finished Dissertation Prospectus which is required in order to begin the dissertation blocks sequence.

    RES 741 Research Methods II (4.5 credit hours)

    This course provides an overview of some of the advanced statistical techniques that are frequently used in business research. The goal is to understand how to apply an appropriate statistical methodology to study and analyze research questions in a dissertation process. Approaches, among others, including understanding the relationship between type I error, power of the test, effect size, and sample size. Specific topics include correlation analysis based on the covariance between variables, simple and multiple regression analysis, hierarchical and binary regression methods, analysis of variance and covariance, multiple analysis of variance, and factor analysis. Learning is facilitated through the latest version of the SPSS Software.

    RES 751 Doctoral Literature Review/Candidacy Review (3 credit hours) This course is a culmination of the research curricula leading the student through a review of the literature. This will include a review and analysis of current literature that focuses on the topic chosen for dissertation research. This review should focus on the methodology, arguments, and frameworks associated with the chosen topic resulting in a clear description of the need for the study. This foundational doctoral course is designed to develop students’ critical thinking and academic writing competencies. Emphasis is placed on examining connections, refreshing the most current APA style guidelines, and understanding the dissertation process. Students will be evaluated on their writing skills in this course.

    EDU 700 Introduction to Advanced Academic Study and Writing (3 credit hours) This course demystifies the doctoral level research process and provides a solid foundation for academic writing by analyzing and evaluating current research articles, literature reviews, and dissertations. Emphasis will be placed on APA-style guidelines, preparation for the doctoral comprehensive examination, university publication requirements, and dissertation.

    EDU 785 Writing for Research and Professional Publications (3 credit hours) This course builds on the introduction to the dissertation process provided in EDU 700 Introduction to Advanced Academic Study and Writing and leads students through the university research proposal, formation of a dissertation committee process, application for human subject review, and revision of dissertation research for journal publication. Students will develop their research questions or hypotheses and submit a finished research proposal or prospectus that is required prior to beginning the dissertation sequence.

    INT 701 Doctoral Internships (1 credit hours)

    The primary objective of the internship course is to align the graduate business program with job experience. The internship course allows students the opportunity to gain practical training and real-life experience pertaining to their current program of study. Engaging in an internship provides students with networking, educational, and career advancement opportunities. The University does not have a direct internship placement service but works with services in the community to alert students of available placements and job openings at outside businesses. There is a close relationship between the business program course of study and the internship course. The high expectations of being an intern/employee and a graduate-level student are part of the internship course experience. 

    The internship program offers the student active engagement in skills related to their professional development. At least one (1) full 16-week term of an internship is required for all students to complete prior to graduation.

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